Skip to main content

About your Search

20121222
20121230
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january first. it would mean more than $600 billion in across-the-board tax increases and automatic spending cuts. >> come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have today. if we go over the cliff, and it looks like that's where we're headed. >> warner: this morning, the senate's democratic majority leader, harry reid, was blunt about chances for a deal. and he blamed house speaker john boehner. just before christmas, boehner floated his so-called "plan b"-- letting taxes rise on millionaires. but faced
the way, he developed a literary curiosity that pivots from dystopian visions of science fiction to the 19th century classic novel, "moby dick." in captain ahab's whaling crew, men of every race are thrown together in pursuit of the elusive and the mythical. diaz sees in this a parable of america then and now. he teaches creative writing at m.i.t. and recently received a prestigious macarthur fellowship, the well-known and coveted "genius grant." junot diaz, welcome. >> oh, thank you for having me. >> well, i've wanted to have you, because i've wanted to ask one of america's foremost storytellers, "what's the story you're telling yourself out of this election?" >> whew, it was bananas watching that election. but i think probably the thing that comes out most forcefully after the election is how little people were expecting the voting, the sort of, the electoral body that made obama's victory possible. i mean, i think there was -- no one was talking about the sort of numbers that showed up for obama. no one was predicting the diversity of the vote. no one was predicting that sort of the rep
this evening's collaboration of our national news and science programs. yesterday, she sat down with education secretary arne duncan for the special. it was the former chicago public school superintendent's first interview since the killings. here's part of their conversation. >> secretary duncan where does the responsibility lie for action here? >> it lies on all of us. all of us as parents, as community leaders, as religious leaders, as political leaders. no one gets to pass on this. and this is to the a time to point fingers or lay blame. often these things, there are lots of inclinations to do that but this is complex and anyone who wants to say there is a simple answer here i think does a great disservice to the complexity and urgency of fundamentally trying to make our country a safer place for our children. >> ifill: the president has asked the committee that you will be on, that vice president biden is going to spearhead to come up with solution or approaches within a month, before the state of the union speech. do you worry that the outrage is going to fade before that happens? >> i d
look at a science story that captured headlines this year. the federal government has taken new steps to limit some of the research it does with chimpanzees, which have long been the source of hope and debate. but questions remain about whether those experiments should occur under any circumstances. "newshour" science correspondent miles o'brien reports. >> reporter: there are no other animals quite like them, except us. they share 99% of our d.n.a. and it shows. they scheme, plot and fight. they care for their babies and they grieve their dead. and they love a good game of catch. as i discovered, queenie had little patience for my wild pitches. >> did you see her stomp her foot? >> reporter: she's very mad at me. those very similarities are at the core of a heated debate over whether scientists should keep using chimpanzees for scientific and medical research. do we owe our cousins something more? here, they say we do. welcome to chimp haven, near shreveport louisiana, a 200-acre oasis of tall trees and hidden daily treats for about 130 chimpanzees. haven co-founder amy fultz put me
somebody or to head off mental health problems. although we're still hoping that science helps to validate that. that's what we think clinically, intuitively. you do want to get in as early as possible. the larger question is the focus of resources and attention. if you look at the new york city area, we had sandy and now we have this terrible thing happen in our broader area. it's very bewildering to keep up with it. it feels very much like after 9/11, the crash of the american airlines 587 and we had anthrax. it was one thing after another. i do think it's very hard to maintain a sustained attention and you just sort of hope that somebody in government and local mental health, local health are keeping their eye
no it's really a science business. core labs, about a $5 billion company and they specialize in helping oil companies find more oil and more gas that benefits all around the world. so they have scientists who actually take samples of rock and water, analyze that and try to help oil companies find more oil that may be hidden or tucked away so we can abscess more oil, which is good for all of us. >> tom: we're talking about an energy boon in the united states, energy prices, that's helped keep a cap on energy prices here. what kind of holding time frame do you anticipate to make some money? >> as we've seen this year, one reason why core labs is attractive from a valuation perfect suspective we've seen the stock soften this year as some of the rig counts have softened as well because of the i prices of natural gas have really fallen. and i do think this will reverse sometime over the next few years and we'll see more rigs be put to use, and that's good for core labs, but to do that you really need to take that three-year time horizon. >> tom: luk, often called a mini berkshire hathaway, b
sciences, engineering and art that has given birth to perhaps more game makers and changers than any other place in the real world and was the home of -- >> find the best in everybody. >> mike: professor randy palm whose last lecture became a phenomenon. it was a viral inspiration to millions but he was an inspiration to the smiths long before that. >> from the beginning of us starting this company he said "you guys really have something here. you have something unique. and keep developing that. keep making a-- make the best company you can possibly make and shoot for the stars." >> mike: shooting for the stars. they can do that. >> it will take you a long time to design a square head on this guy. >> yeah. >> mike: it's no secret that the new media-- both the internet and digital devices-- has taken a large bite out of the newspaper and magazine businesses. but there are some notable exceptions. we'll take you now to one company that is determined not to let the sun set on old media. it is doing more than just scratching for chicken feed in the media barnyard. it is planting the seeds of n
. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financialor literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations.ra and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation forr public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)